Research Communication

I wanted to create something to visually represent different types of research communication. I wanted to get the point across that not all communication is public engagement, similarly not all blogs or social media is public engagement, or journalism. But some are. I think there is a place for all of these in research communication different people contribute to different parts in different ways and amounts.  

Please note, this diagram is not based on data and it isn't supposed to represent relative contributions to science communication (although if anyone had any ideas/data so I/we could do that it would be amazing). It represents overlaps. I wanted to use this with researchers to show how varied research communication is. Any feedback or suggestions would be great! 



Comments

  1. Reminds me of a post-fertilised cell getting on with the business of dividing :)

    I think it's also interesting to look at, in addition to the *methods* by which research is communicated, the purposes for a particular bit of communication.

    With my (former employee of) Diabetes UK hat on we communicated the research that we had funded for several reasons - we wanted to let people know what we'd spent their money on (and those people wanted to know), we wanted to use that information in fundraising too so not just for an external 'people with diabetes' audience but fundraising staff too.

    We also commented on others' research - particularly where something's got into the papers and my rather brilliant ex-boss Iain would get to say something considerably less banal than "this is interesting, more research is needed" - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2177663/Cheese-beats-diabetes-Just-slices-day-reduce-risk-developing-disease-study-claims.html

    And we used the research that we and others funded to inform the patient information leaflets that we wrote, along with general information in our members' magazine. But also stuff for healthcare professionals too - both stuff FOR them for their own interest but also to flag up things that patients might be asking them about (eg when the islet cell transplantation programme really got going).

    Hark at me banging on about charity science communication ;)

    Jo

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    Replies
    1. I think it would be good to incorporate purposes as well as methods and show what methods can be used for different purposes.. but I think that would need to go on a different diagram.

      My primary aim with this was to create something that I was able to use with researchers to demonstrate how things overlap.. and that research communication isn't all about talking to kids in schools about what you are doing. The fact that not all public events are necessarily public engagement is another bit I wanted to highlight.

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  2. My aim is nearly always to talk about charity science communication :D

    But yes, very important to highlight different ways of working and different audiences.

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