Posts

Showing posts from May, 2012

Negative Calorie Food: Science Myths and Legends

Image
A popular diet belief is that there are some amazing diet wonderfoods that contain negative calories, like celery. So if you eat lots of them, you will burn extra calories; without even lifting a finger.
The theory goes, negative calorie foods contain fewer calories than they take to digest. Celery is a reported 'negative calorie food'. If one lump (this is a hypothetical example) contains 6 calories, but it takes 10 calories to digest then the body uses 4 calories and does not gain any.
I had some faith in the principal of this idea, it seemed to make sense in my head. Maybe I had just turned my skeptical inquisitive brain off, or maybe, a part of me just wanted to accept that it might be a possibility.. A quick google search revealed a host of information, news articles and blog posts on this subject. Dr Stu posted a blog post summarising some of the literature about negative calorie foods very recently.

Sadly, but predictably, I discovered, there are no scientific studie…

Happy Scientists

Image
It's Friday and although I will be working over the weekend, I am feeling pretty cheerful. Lab life can get you down sometimes, a never ending stream of failed experiments, things to do, late nights, early mornings and a lack of appreciation. Personality clashes, politics and unwanted work are themes from any work life.

But, sometimes, labs can be the most fun place to be, a source of comedy, fun and practical jokes. 

Here are some things that have made me SMILE and kept me HAPPY over the past 2.5 years. The people you work with can keep you going.  Please share your sad times and good times (practical joke tales encouraged) and keep laughing.


 
 
 
 



 
   


Making Lab Life Easier With Technology

Image
Working in a laboratory can be stressful, and cause tension (see my post about lab post-it notes and the radio). Can new technologies help make life easier, by saving time and enabling easy sharing of work? Or is sticking with old-fashioned paper methods better? (I have already posted about how I like the idea of e-lab books)

I get really annoyed that labs are at the forefront of new discoveries, new science and THE FUTURE, but often work in an old-fashioned way with paper notes and old equipment (my computer is currently on its last legs, I am pretty sure it isn't going to survive 'the thesis').

In the lab I work in, we are pretty old-school. Order numbers and prices are found on a computer, written down on paper and then put back in a computer. Excel files and written lists are used to keep track of what comes in and where it is kept in the lab, but these are not available to update on a computer. But saying all this, in general, it seems to work well.. so why change it…